More about the Trekking Peaks of Nepal

The so-called “Trekking Peaks” of Nepal give novice and hobby-climbers an opportunity to tackle a Himalayan peak without having to organise a major expedition – regulations and permitting arrangements are relatively simple and not costly. Originally there were 15 peaks listed for which climbing permits are issued by the Nepal Mountaineering Association (now referred to as Category “B” Peaks). However, in 2002, 18 new peaks were added, referred to as category “A” peaks.

Ranging in altitude between 5500m and 6500m, climbs on the mountains vary considerably in technical difficulty, from small, non-technical ascents (some of the new category A peaks are little more than high altitude scrambles, previously visited by trekking parties seeking interesting detours), to climbs requiring a high level of technical climbing ability – Cholatse, for example, was downgraded from full expedition status. Many of these peaks are located in the popular trekking areas (Everest, Manang/Annapurna and Langtang regions), have easy access and can be undertaken within a relatively short period of time.

Which one?

There exist a handful of peaks that give novice climbers a chance to top a respectable Himalayan summit, involving an ascent over snow and ice terrain; these are the peaks that we focus on:

Selected Trekking Peaks

Name

Height

Region

Grade

 

  Mera Peak

6,476m

  Khumbu/Makalu-Barun

  Alpine F/PD*

  Island Peak

6,189m

  Khumbu

  Alpine PD

  Nya Kanga

5,844m

  Langtang

  Alpine PD

  Pisang Peak

6,091m

  Manang

  Alpine PD

  Chulu East

6,200m

  Manang

  Alpine PD+

  Chulu West

6,419m

  Manang

  Alpine AD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 *For many years the climb was Alpine Grade F (Facile / Easy), but due to recent summit block changes the final 30-40 meters has become Grade PD (Peu difficile)

To learn more about these and other Trekking Peaks, we recommend you seek out “The Trekking Peaks of Nepal” by Bill O’Connor (ISBN 1 85223 651 5).  This is currently out of print, but can often be found at Glacier Books in Scotland, on Amazon, or in Bookshops in Kathmandu.